‘The Onion’ Can’t Compete With The ‘Real’ News.

Sense vs Nonsense - Traffic sign with two options - meaningfulness and usefulness based on reason and vs stupid, silly and illogical absurdity

How can the ‘fake’ news ‘Onion’ stay in business when it can’t compete with the humor provided by the ‘real’ news?

‘The ONION’ couldn’t make up these two (real) stories:

ESPN Removes Robert Lee From Calling U-Va Game In Charlottesville Because Of His Name, – The Washington Post.

Traveler, USC Mascot, Comes Under Scrutiny For Having A Name Similar To Robert E. Lee’s Horse, – The LA Times.

Here is a story The ONION came up with: Six Flags Removes Confederate Flag.

Which is better?

How absurd have the squeaky wheels and the media become when a ‘Real Fake News Paper’, which is trying to be funny, can’t come close to being as funny as the ‘real’ news stories which are supposedly serious.

The good news is a majority of people can’t relate to this absurdity. And as the media continues to cover the behaviour of the people on the fringe, more people will see it for what it is and stand against it.

 

THE SILLIEST GENERATION

Victor Davis Hanson’s recent article titled: The Silliest Generation,  gives great insight into the world in which we live. It makes you think, which is always a good thing. Here are some excerpts from the article:

“Every generation, in its modesty, used to think the prior one was far better. Tom Brokaw coined “The Greatest Generation” to remind Americans of what our fathers endured during the Depression and World War II—with the implicit message that we might not have been able to do what they did.””

Yet what is strange about the present age is that our current generation uniquely believes just the opposite. Apparently, we believe that most cadres before us were not up to our standards. Indeed, we are having to clean up their messes of racism, sexism, homophobia, nativism, xenophobia, and Islamophobia, as well as environmental desecration and global warming.”

“Apparently, proof our generation’s genius is that no one in the past had a clue how to build an iPhone or do a Google search—or even make a good Starbucks Teavana shaken pineapple black tea infusion. Yet given our own present lack of humility and meager accomplishments, we have combined arrogance with ignorance to become the smuggest generation in memory. What good is the high-tech acceleration in delivering information if there is now precious little learning to be accelerated? Google is an impressive pump, but if there is no real water, what is the point of delivering nothing faster?”

“For the silliest generation, human nature should somehow be seen as perfectible as a smartphone app. So no wonder we allow no glitches in the way people talk or think, if we sense they dare to deviate from our programmed correctness.”

“Rhetoric trumps muscle. The majority of Americans no longer work with their hands, grow food, make or build things, and they are paid quite handsomely to avoid such drudgery. But the result on society at large is that abstraction rules over practicality, and nature remains theoretical and deified rather than concrete and thus sometimes feared.”

“Those who sit at desks all day believe nature is mastered as easily as the temperature control in their offices—without much acknowledgement that different sorts of people are pumping natural gas to heat turbines to make electricity to send it into high-rises—and it isn’t always easy or clean. Techies love four-wheel drive cars, hiking boots, and parkas, as if by being prepared to go anywhere they can feel good about going nowhere.”

“The more technologically sophisticated we become, the more like a Mycenaean top-heavy palace we grow vulnerable. If the grid goes down, will those in Menlo Park learn that food is not grown at Whole Foods or that there is no such thing as a raisin plant?”

“This present generation’s impulse to play judge, jury, and executioner of the culpable of our past takes for granted that it does so as the moral superior of our forefathers. But that premise is an unfounded assumption.”

 

Related Article – If you liked that article, you might want to read another recent article by Victor Davis Hanson titled: Our War Against Memory.

 

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