Posted tagged ‘Central Planners’

Must Reads For The Week 11/29/14

November 29, 2014
The pen is mightier than the sword...

 The pen is mightier than the sword… (Photo credit: mbshane)

How Government Officials Are Using Bank Regulations To Shut Down Industry, at economicpolicyjournal.com. Government regulators are pressuring banks to stop doing business with industries that are not liked by the administration such as firearms makers, payday lenders, ammunition dealers, and others. It’s called Operation Choke Point. It chokes off banking services for these industries with the hope of driving them out of business. Oh that’s right that can’t happen here!

Grab Some Popcorn: Investigators May Have Found Up To 30K Lois Lerner E-Mails, at targetliberty.com. These were found three weeks after the election. In the words of Hilary Clinton, “What difference at this point does it make?”

Obamacare Enrollment Numbers Have Been Bogus, at investors.com. Who among us would ever believe that Government officials would “put their thumb on the scale” in order to get a desired outcome?

The People’s Republic Of San Francisco Is Now Micro-Managing Employee Schedules Of Chain Stores, at economicpolicyjournal.com. There is no limit to what central planners think they can regulate.

58 Experts Who Do Not Believe Global Warming Is A Crisis, at targetliberty.com. These 58 heretics should be burned at the stake for denying the religion of global warming.

SendMyBag Arrives In The In The U.S. To Take Your Luggage When Airlines Won’t, by Steve O’Hear, at techcrunch.com. People are looking for cheaper and more reliable ways of getting their luggage to their destination, and SendMyBag has stepped in to supply the service. Why couldn’t central planners in Government have come up with this idea?

Find A Loving Dog Sitter And Dog Walker, at rover.com. Once again the dynamism of the free market creates a service that people are willing to pay for. This is the Uber idea, for dogs.

Airbnb Is 2014 Company Of The Year, by Bert Helm, at inc.com. This is how technology is bringing buyers and sellers together, creating a more efficient use of scarce resources. Just as Big Taxi is against Uber, Big Hotel will be against this bed and breakfast company.

Uber Against Racial Profiling, by Howard Baetjer Jr., at fee.org. Here is an excerpt from the article, “Uber has a strong incentive to give its drivers the incentive to pick up every rider — black, white, or brown — right away. It does that in two ways. First, it reduces its drivers’ reasons for racial profiling. Uber has each rider’s name, cell phone number, credit card information, and the time and route of the ride, so Uber riders are unlikely to rob drivers.” The free market makes discrimination costly policy.

Saudi Texas: An Amazing Chart Of An Amazing Job Creating State, by Mark J. Perry, at aei.org. If it wasn’t for the jobs created in Texas, the US would have negative job growth since the economic collapse of 08.

Looters Of Trinkets & Looters Of Treasures, at targetliberty.com.

Here is a video of Odell Beckham Jr. making an unbelieveable catch for a touchdown.

 

If you want to know how you make a catch like that, watch this video.

 

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice practice practice.

 

 

 

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Must Reads For The Week 6/14/14

June 14, 2014
The pen is mightier than the sword...

 The pen is mightier than the sword… (Photo credit: mbshane)

 

Rehypothecation Evaporation Concerns Grow, As Copper Plunges Most In Three Months, at zerohedge.com. Rehypothecation is simply selling claims on a commodity, a good, a product, etc, above the amount that exists. If the owner of the Mona Lisa wants to store the painting in your art warehouse, you give him a receipt for the painting. This receipt is a claim on a particular painting by the owner, to be redeemed at any time. What if you make a counterfeit receipt and sell it. There are now two claims on the Mona Lisa. If you own a grain elevator, farmers will store their corn, measured in bushels, in your bins, and you give them a receipt for X amount of bushels to be redeemed at any time. You don’t have to give the farmer back the exact bushels of corn he brought in because bushels of corn are homogenous, unlike the Mona Lisa. What if you started selling counterfeit receipts for the corn? What if you have twice as many claims on bushels of corn as you have bushels of corn in your grain bins?  Your theft will remain hidden until such time that you don’t have enough corn to cover a receipt that is presented. The rehypothecation of copper, and the examples of the Mona Lisa and the bushels of corn, are examples of  how our Fractional Reserve Banking System works. Banks can loan out 10 times the amount of money they hold in reserve. If they have $1million in reserve, they can loan out $10 million. Money never exchanges hands, it is transferred electronically when a check {warehouse receipt} is presented. Its a sweet deal for the banks because they get to collect interest on the electronically printed counterfeit money {warehouse receipts}. Unfortunately this counterfeit money has been released in the market and is causing the unintended consequences of misallocating scarce resources and inflation. Read  more about this topic in my article here.

Texas Mom Outraged Because Her Daughters School Won’t Allow Sunscreen, by Rebecca Klein, at huffingtonpost.com. I love it when the rules central planners make come into conflict with each other. In this case officials at the district banned sunscreen because it is a toxic substance. But what about the central planners who have regulated tanning bed use by minors because of the possible danger of skin cancer. Central planners are all or nothing rule makers. They don’t understand that life consists of tradeoffs. But more importantly they don’t understand that decisions concerning these kinds of trade offs should be made by each individual or in this case the parent.  In this case the individual has to trade off one danger, the risk of the toxicity of the sunscreen against the risk of getting skin cancer. As I have learned from reading Thomas Sowell, their are no categorical solutions, just incremental trade offs. Central planners don’t understand that the more incremental decisions they take away from individuals, and make them categorical decisions for everybody, {except for themselves} the more strife they create between us and them.

LET’S LOOK AT MINIMUM WAGE REALITY

1) A Report From The Bakken Oil Fields, Where The Jobless Rate Is 0.9% And WalMart Is Paying 2.4 Times The Minimum Wage, by Mark J. Perry, at aei-ideas.org. The Federal minimum wage rate is $7:25, as is North Dakotas minimum wage rate. Will the central planners, at the federal and state levels, mandate that the wages of these workers at the bottom of the wage scale be dropped to $7:25 an hour just to be “fair” to the other minimum wage workers in other states?  Or should the central planners pass a law that mandates a maximum level of the minimum wage? These planners apparently have more knowledge about what wages should be than the knowledge the market can bring to bear on wage rates. The market in North Dakota is obviously wrong for paying these low skilled workers over double what the mandated minimum wage is. Don’t these central planners exist to correct the inequalities produced in the market?

2) Seattle Business Charges “Living Wage” Tax In Response To $15 Minimum Wage Hike, by Jessica Chasmar, at washingtimes.com. Plans by central planners can’t work like the planners planned. Why? Because there is still enough of a free market remaining that businesses have options other than just paying the new minimum wage rate. They can raise prices like this company, they can replace labor with technology. they can replace low skilled low wage labor with more productive higher skilled higher wage labor, or they can look to cut costs elsewhere in the production process. If raising the minimum wage for low skilled labor would increase production and profit, businesses would already be paying a higher wage, just like what is happening in North Dakota because of the oil boom.

NOW LETS HAVE SOME LAUGHS

12 Things Men Do Differently Than Women, at economicpolicyjournal.com.

Pee Wee Obama, at theburningplatform.com. I’ve been trying hard not to do this, but I can’t help myself.

Compare this video of President Working Out In Polish Gym, to this, Olivia Newton John, Physical video.

I saw these cartoons at theburningplatform.com.

WHEN THESE POWER PLANTS CLOSE, WHERE WILL THE ELECTRICITY COME FROM?

149321 600 Rates Skyrocket cartoons

 COAL POWERED CARS, I PADS, AND I PHONES

149426 600 Coal Industry cartoons

SOCIALIZED MEDICINE BY ANY OTHER  NAME…..

149459 600 Making Obamacare Look Good cartoons

Must Reads For The Week 5/17/14

May 17, 2014
The pen is mightier than the sword...

 The pen is mightier than the sword… (Photo credit: mbshane)

People Go Bananas Over Monkey Parking, by Alexia Tsotsis, at techcrunch.com. Another example of technology economizing on information. Since drivers are willing to pay for the information about open parking spots, the cost of the service must be less than the cost in gas and time spent driving around looking for an open parking space. I think Government regulators would be on board with this idea, because less CO2 would be spewed into the air as cars wouldn’t be driving around as long looking for parking spots.

ObamaCare Contractors Paid To Sit At Computers And Hit Refresh, at nypost.com. When Government tries to centrally plan economic activities, wasting scarce resources is always the result. In this case, labor is the scarce resource that is being paid to perform an unproductive activity.

Quotation Of The Day On The Keystone XL Pipeline, by Mark J. Perry, at aei-ideas.org. ” Stopping keystone insures more railroad tank-car spills.”  Another example of Government regulations not just leading to less safe conditions, but adding to the cost of production. There is no way to insure 100% safety. Safety is traded off against the cost of an acceptable degree of risk. When The Obama administration shut down the Keystone pipeline they incentivized a less safe, higher cost oil delivery system. And guess who pays the cost in dollars and safety?

Rebellion In The USA – Protesters Attempt To Arrest Albuquerque Police Chief, by Mark Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog, at zerohedge.com. The break down of the rule of law happens when our rulers abuse their power. In this case the Albuquerque police department is out of control and the justice department has started an investigation. We have to use every peaceful method available  before we resort to the tactics that were used in this meeting. This affords the city council the opportunity to dismiss these protesters as extreme and the video evidence will back them up. The father that I showed last week getting arrested at the school board meeting for going past the two-minute speaking rule gained more support for his position because the school board looked extreme for having him arrested. The cost of using force to bring about change will be very high. We haven’t exhausted all of the lower cost avenues available to bring about change.

Football Player Sent To Re-Education Camp For Dissenting View, by Shane Kastler, at economicpolicyjournal.com. The PC police paint themselves into a corner when they anoint too many groups for protection. In this case they had to choose between a black NFL player expressing an opinion about a black homosexual draft choice. The order in which they value these two particular groups was revealed in their choice. On what rung of the PC ladder does a white homosexual fall?

Socialism Does Not Work /Danial Hannan / Oxford Union, youtube video. Danial Hannan does a great job explaining why socialism doesn’t produce the results the planners planned. Socialism uses force to make individuals comply with planners plans {Obamacare}. Socialists don’t like the spontaneous order, {Read my article Spontaneous Order = Free Market} that results when individuals are free to make decisions on what they produce, consume, and exchange. The only reason central planners think that socialism hasn’t worked is because it hasn’t been tried by the right people, namely them. Read my article, Why Socialism Won’t Work: Human Nature.

McDonald’s Kiosks In Action, at economicpolicyjournal.com. McDonalds is using cashier kiosks in its European restaurants. If our local, state and federal Government succeeds in raising the minimum wage above the value it produces,  Mcdonalds won’t be the only business that will have no choice than to replace these workers with kiosks.

News Reporting Is No Longer The Exclusive Domain Of Establishment Propagandists, at economicpolicyjournal.com. This is the creative destruction of  the free market at work. Everybody with a smart phone is a potential reporter. All of us are capable of being “on the scene” first, getting the scoop on the limited number of “real” journalists {propagandists}. The six o’clock news and the morning newspaper are reporting old news. News travels almost instantly via social media.

 

Must Reads For The Week 11/23/13

November 23, 2013
The pen is mightier than the sword...

The pen is mightier than the sword… (Photo credit: mbshane)

This first article and video is a must!

The War Against Achievement, by Thomas Sowell, at jewishworldreview.com. When individuals achieve at a higher level than you, are you envious and try to tear them down, or do you use their achievement as motivation of what is possible if you work hard? Watch this video about Richie Parker, the young man Thomas Sowell is talking about in his article.

Mother Charged $10 dollars After Lunch Of Pot Roast, Potatoes, Carrots, And An Orange Deemed “Unbalanced” By Daycare, by Liz Klimas, at theblaze.com. If you want to look where the road we’re traveling leads, look at countries who are farther down this road. Oh yeah I forgot, “this can’t happen here”.

The Obamacare Time Bomb, by Marc A. Thiessen, at economicpolicyjournal.com. In the words of the great F. A. Hayek, “The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.”

Census “Faked” 2012 Elections Jobs Report, by John Crudele, at nypost.com. Most of us knew the number was fudged when it came out.

I Can’t Call You Sugar, Cause Sugar Never Was So Sweet, by Angus, at mungowitzend.blogspot.com. This is what we mean when we talk about crony capitalism. In a free market, unhampered by Government regulations, businesses will succeed or fail based on their ability to sell a good or service at a price that covers the cost of production.

Nancy Pelosi Doesn’t Think She Said Anything Wrong About Keeping Health Plan, by Robert P. Murphy, at consultingbyrpm.com. My apology for wanting you to watch a video of Nancy Pelosi. I don’t know what is more amazing, watching Nancy try to spin her way out of her own pile of #%&*, or watching David Gregory try to act like a journalist asking tough questions.

The Treasury Federal Reserve Naked Tango, by Lawrence Kotlikoff, at economicpolicyjournal.com. Counterfeiting and money laundering are legal activities for Government, but not for us. Counterfeiting is theft whether it’s legal of illegal.

School Heaves Obama Lunch Menu, at ohiolibertycoalition.org. Students force Obama’s school lunch program to face economic reality. Read this post from a year ago titled, Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, Doesn’t Work As Planners Planned, at austrianaddict.com.

California Rejects Proposed One-Year Plan Extension, at zerohedge.com. The pesky free market won’t cooperate with the central planner and chief’s plans concerning Obamacare.

Guest Post: The 5 Economic “Big Lies” The Government Is Telling You, by Micheal Snyder, guest post on zerohedge.com. This post is so

Walter E. Williams Talks About Central Planners.

November 29, 2012

Read more by Walter E. Williams in this article titled, “Tyrants and Human Nature”, at jewishworldreview.com.